MCB Brain Plast program at a glance


Monday, 04.09.2017

1.30 pm– 6.00 pm
Welcome
Keynote lecture 1
Symposium 1: Neuroplasticity: How genes & molecules manifest physiology & behavior


Tuesday, 05.09.2017

9.00 am– 12.30 pm
Keynote lecture 2
Symposium 2: The 'brain's' change of view - neural basis of behavioral flexibility
2 pm – 8.30 pm
Symposium 3: Changing Matters - Intrinsic plasticity in health and disease
Meet the Speakers + poster session


Wednesday, 06.09.2017

9.00 am– 1.00 pm
Symposium 4: The multiple faces of stress: A tale of (mal-) adaptation
Keynote lecture 3
Closing remarks


Summaries for MCB Brain Plast symposia

1 Neuroplasticity: How genes & molecules manifest physiology & behavior

The purpose of our symposium is to provide insights on how neuronal function and plasticity involved in learning and memory emerge from the molecular mechanisms at the single cell level as well as from the interactions between cells in the brain. These aspects will be presented in the model systems like Drosophila melanogaster, Aplysia or rat.

2 The ‘brain’s’ change of view - neural basis of behavioral flexibility

In this symposium we aim to bundle research looking from different angles on how the brain adapts in our ever changing environment. Combined insights from molecular, systemic and psychological research will allow to discuss the underlying brain mechanisms of flexible adaptations of behavior.

3 Changing Matters - Intrinsic plasticity in health and disease

Synaptic transmission is just the beginning of a very complex process that finishes with a decision to fire or not fire an action potential. How intrinsic properties of neurons, with special emphasis on properties on ion channels on neuronal dendritic membrane, affect this decision and how changes in these intrinsic properties relate to physiology and pathology are the main topics in our Symposium.

4 The multiple faces of stress: A tale of (mal-) adaptation

Stress is a complex experience that provides a potential threat to the physical and psychological well-being of an individual. Usually, the central nervous system is set to efficiently cope with stress exposure, but under certain circumstances adaptation fails and long-lasting alterations in anxiety, mood and cognition are observed. In our Symposium we will discuss recent findings and models to explore factors contributing to risk and resilience of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders.